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Schedule Updates

AUGUST 2017

Irrigation Installation, Service & Repairs
We are performing the Sprinkler System Checks & Repair services. You should have your irrigation set to run 4-5 days per week, 10 minutes on pop-up zones and 20-25 minutes on rotating zones. Give us a call if you are ready to get on the schedule. If you are interested in having an irrigation system installed, please give the office a call at 913-829-6135.

Turf Maintenance
We are applying Round 5 of our 7 Round Turf Program. Round 5 is a liquid application targeting nutsedge, broadleaf, and grassy weeds in the lawn. Turf Managers will also assess lawns at this time to determine if and what is needed as far as a Fall Lawn Renovation. Aeration, verticutting and overseeding being the common items to be done in order to keep the lawn full and thick. If you are interested in starting your personalized turf health plan please give us a call.

Plant Health Care
We are currently applying Round 3 of our plant insecticide program for the 2017 season. Round 3 is a treatment to control primarily spider mites on spruce, junipers and burning bush. Please call to schedule a consultation with one of our certified Arborist today.

Mowing Service
The mowing season has begun and will run weekly from now until the end of October. Due to the rainy weather they may be behind a day or two but will work weekends to catch up. If you are interested in the weekly mowing service, please contact the office.

Tar spot on mapels

Recently we have seen alot of below disease on maples here is good article from purdue on what it is and how to treat

Tar Spot on Maple

 

The following question was sent to the P&PDL diagnosticians here at Purdue University:

Question: Almost every summer the leaves on my maple trees have black spots on them that look like tar. What is it and what should I do about it?

Answer: Tar spot on maple is not actually "tar" on maple, but rather a fungal disease. Tar spots on maples are caused by fungi in the genus Rhytisma. The most common species are Rhytisma acerinum and R. punctatum.

Symptoms first appear in late spring or early summer as infected leaves develop light green or yellow-green spots. During mid to late summer, black tar-like raised structures are formed on the upper surface of leaves within the yellow spots. R. acerinum causes spots that are 0.5 to 2 cm in diameter; R. punctatum causes spots that are smaller (about 1mm in diameter). Spots caused by R. punctatum are sometimes called speckled tar spots.

Tar spot diseases seldom are detrimental to the overall health of infected trees. Tar spots may cause premature defoliation, but are not known to kill trees. Tar spot diseases are best managed by raking and destroying fallen leaves because the fungi overwinter on leaves.

–Peggy Sellers

 

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