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Schedule Updates

AUGUST 2017

Irrigation Installation, Service & Repairs
We are performing the Sprinkler System Checks & Repair services. You should have your irrigation set to run 4-5 days per week, 10 minutes on pop-up zones and 20-25 minutes on rotating zones. Give us a call if you are ready to get on the schedule. If you are interested in having an irrigation system installed, please give the office a call at 913-829-6135.

Turf Maintenance
We are applying Round 5 of our 7 Round Turf Program. Round 5 is a liquid application targeting nutsedge, broadleaf, and grassy weeds in the lawn. Turf Managers will also assess lawns at this time to determine if and what is needed as far as a Fall Lawn Renovation. Aeration, verticutting and overseeding being the common items to be done in order to keep the lawn full and thick. If you are interested in starting your personalized turf health plan please give us a call.

Plant Health Care
We are currently applying Round 3 of our plant insecticide program for the 2017 season. Round 3 is a treatment to control primarily spider mites on spruce, junipers and burning bush. Please call to schedule a consultation with one of our certified Arborist today.

Mowing Service
The mowing season has begun and will run weekly from now until the end of October. Due to the rainy weather they may be behind a day or two but will work weekends to catch up. If you are interested in the weekly mowing service, please contact the office.

Watering Green

Did you know…….

623 gallons of water can be harvested from 1 inch of rainwater on a 1,000 sq ft roof!

Another possible disease brought on by this crazy weather

Lirope is consider the  bullet-proof  by most gardners but dry weather and  excessive watering creates new problem. We are seeing a new disease  described as crown rot, caused by Phytophthora palmivora. The disease is exacerbated by wet soil so don’t do any irrigation for the rest of the summer. Fungicide drenches can control the disease but they are too expensive to consider

Deep water trees

Due to the extreme heat and drought trees need an extra drink.   Although most people feel the irrigation is enough its not, deep watering is the key and will keep your tree from early dormany and in some cases death.  You should be watering trees 1 to 2 times a week with a hose for 20 minutes on a trickel with the hosed placed 2 to 3ft away from the trunk .

Overwintering Tropical Plants

Tropicals are expensive to replace every year so if you have some you really like you can overwinter them in your house or basement.  Most tropicals will overwinter with minimal care all that is required is to water once a month and make sure they recieve some light.  Light can be provided naturally or by artifical lighting.

Butterflys

Have you ever gazed out of the kitchen window at your beautiful wildlife garden on a cold winter’s day?  It looks so barren and lonely.  Have you ever wondered where the butterflies go during this time of year?
 

Dormant Pruning

Don't forget to cut your ornamental grasses and shrub roses back this spring before spring growth starts.  This is important to remove old growth as well as encourage new, healthy growth.

 

Contemporary Watering

 Check out this modern take on the old watering can…..it doubles as a sculpture!  This idea takes the original watering can structure and turns it upside down, being wider as opposed to taller.  The unique design also frees up space with storage.  Check them out at www.alessi.com

When to fertilize your Azaleas?

Feed your Azaleas every two months with an acid type fertilizer (mir-acid) starting from the onset of new spring growth, until late summer.  If chlorosis occurs (yellow foliage with green veins), treat plants with a product containing chelated iron.

Azaleas need and thrive in acidic soils.  Ideal PH is 4-5.5.  Always take a soil test to determine PH before planting these plants in your lawn.  Once Azaleas are established and you have reached the correct PH levels, you may need to fertilize as much.

“Dog Vomit Fungus”, what?

Have you ever seen the lovely sight of the “Dog Vomit Fungus” growing in a mulched area ?

The Dog Vomit Fungus is not a fungus, but a slime mold. I guess calling it the “Dog Vomit Slime Mold” wasn’t very appealing to the International Association of Slime Mold Naming Scientists (IASMNS). Anyway, its scientific name is Fuligo septica. Which, when roughly translated into english means, “sticky stuff on the bottom of Bob’s shoe”.

The next stage in the life of this slime mold is quite depressing.